I’m Thinking What To Post Now Before I Sleep

Some of the books/paperbacks I’m reading slowly but surely most recently is making me think about them before I sleep. These books are:

The Idealist.org Handbook to Building a Better World: How to Turn Your Good Intentions into Actions that Make a Difference authored by Idealist.org with Stephanie Land

Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure authored by Tim Harford

The Undercover Economist authored by Tim Harford

Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success (How We Can Learn To Fulfill Our Potential) authored by Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D.

Japan: The Story Of A Nation authored by Edwin O. Reischauer

Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account Of Operation Redding And The Lost Heroes Of Seal Team 10 authored by Marcus Luttrell with Patrick Robinson

Getting To Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In authored by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton of the Harvard Negotiation Project

Losing My Virginity: The Autobiography authored by Richard Branson

Think Big: Unleashing Your Potential For Excellence authored by Ben Carson, MD with Cecil Murphey

Howard Hughes: The Untold Story authored by Peter Harry Brown and Pat H. Broeske

China’s Megatrends: The 8 Pillars Of A New Society authored by John & Doris Naisbitt

Bad Science authored by Ben Goldacre

The Clean Tech Revolution: The Next Big Growth and Investment Opportunity authored by Ron Pernick and Clint Wilder

The 101 Habits Of Highly Successful Screenwriters: Insider Secrets from Hollywood’s Top Writers authored by Karl Iglesias

Stress: What It Is; What It Can Do To Your Health; How To Fight Back authored by Walter McQuade and Ann Aikman

Water: All That Matters authored by Paul L. Younger

How To Blog A Book: Write, Publish, and Promote Your Work One Post At A Time authored by Nina Amir

Chasing Cool: Standing Out In Today’s Cluttered Marketplace authored by Noah Lerner and Gene Pressman

Cesar Millan’s Short Guide To A Happy Dog: 98 Essential Tips and Techniques

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Solar Energy, The Clean Tech Revolution, and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond

Solar Energy, The Clean Tech Revolution, and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond

Small-scale experiments for best practices and beyond leads to national and global growth and development that’s renewable and sustainable; best and less carbon footprint and consumption of natural resources.

Me and my effective team is always thinking and doing small-scale experiments for best practices and beyond that’s sustainable and renewable.

On October 22, 1978, China’s leader Deng Xiaoping and 83 year old Founder Konosuke Matsushita of Japan’s Matsushita Electronic met in person in Japan for Meeting of the Minds and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond that’s sustainable and renewable. Both real men practiced real deal leadership.

Mr. Konosuke Matsushita of Japan asked China’s leader Deng Xiaoping what he might find of interest in Japan.

Mr. Deng Xiaoping answered that winters were extremely cold in China and people had to burn briquettes to stay warm, with the result that they often fell prey to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Mr. Deng Xiaoping wondered whether Japan had briquettes which did not produce carbon monoxide.

Mr. Deny was the first Chinese official to visit Japan since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949. It was symbolic that he made this one of his first foreign visits after assuming his new responsibilities.

It was of course not lost on Deng that Japan was having a very successful experience in rebuilding a war-ravaged country.

A closer relationship with a booming neighbor would help China in its own rebuilding through shared experience, trade, and economic development.

The last thirty years of an increasingly better relationship with Japan has vindicated Deng’s early judgment and first steps not only to open China up but to bury an old hatred, and build new relationships to enable China to join the world.

That’s what I call real leadership.

Why I cite them from the books Wu Xiaobo’s China Emerging and China’s Megatrends of John & Doris Naisbitt?

Because from the book The Undercover Economist of Tim Harford, China’s leader Deng Xiaoping initiated first small-scale experiments to rice/agricultural reforms that created the momentum to the rest of the economy. Those who had good ideas, good luck, and who worked hard prospered.

And Why I cite Japan?

Because Japanese from the book Japan: The Story of A Nation of Edwin O. Reischauer, foster the notable propensity for cooperation and consensus decision-making in small groups.

To be continued about this blog/article because I’m now somehow tired because of many factors and due diligence.

My Enagic Kangen Water Sustainable Odyssey

These pictures/photos were taken by me in real life as part of my first hand experience Sustainable Odyssey:

 

Kangen is a Japanese word which means back to origin.

 

Leonardo Da Vinci said that Water is the driving force of all nature.

 

It is unpopularized that water is our most precious resource because most people take it for granted for so many unreasonable ways and means. You somehow know what I’m talking about.

I somehow adapted the very important information below from the book Water: All That Matters authored by Paul L. Younger for your priceless sustainable benefit.

Always remember that so many of the best in life is nearly free or free itself for the common good of humanity. You just have to work well for it. You somehow have an idea what I mean by the word free.

Here are some of the very important information about water:

 

More than two-thirds of the surface of our planet earth is submerged beneath it. Also almost the same proportion of the body mass of every human adult is composed of water.

Most people can survive without food for weeks but will die after only three days or so without drinking water.

I like this part, if we exist for very long without drinking water the part of the forebrain known as the hypothalamus triggers the thirst response that make us seek water with relentless urgency.

How much do you truly value Water?

Let’s do it in monetary terms: What’s the price of sunset over the Caribbean? It’s somehow hard to sustain the notion that water is the most precious resource.

Why?

To some places, one penny will buy you about one gallon or 4.5 liters of tap water. That is somehow you have to pay 630 times as much for the same amount of gasoline.

If you will buy a bottled water, it will only cost you about a fifth of the cost of gasoline.

Assuming you will not buy the designer bottled water Berg which is sold at Claridge, London for about $135 or more for 4.5 liters.

In terms of market or commercial value, majority of the world population value gasoline up to 630 times more than water.

This is very interesting, beer is valued more highly. Beer is about 1,900 times the cost of water. So much for water as our most precious resource. Sincerely yours, Byron M. Vidal Enagic Kangen Water Distributor and Advocate, My Global Distributor ID number is 170-3221

Japan: The Story Of A Nation

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Japan: The Story Of A Nation

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How do I start writing about this worthwhile pursuit?  Let me first pause and think well. Word by word, my well-rounded journey of success about Japan in its entirety.  First and foremost, it all nearly started with the book, Japan: The Story Of A Nation, authored by Edwin O. Reischauer.  One thing leads to another, or even more.  The long standing adage somehow keeps me on track,  “A Journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”  Word by word every step of my way.

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The book,  Japan: The Story Of A Nation by Edwin O. Reischauer was written or originally published so many years before I was born.  It was originally published on 1970.  The book has four editions, the one that I own is the third edition.  The very first thought that comes to my mind when the book is at stake is the very own words from the book itself:

The notable Japanese propensity for cooperation and consensus decision-making in small groups.

Why those words impact me well as part of my life-changing experience? Because for me it’s real deal leadership at its very best.

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The second thought that comes to my mind is the very own words from the book itself:

The great sensitivity the Japanese have shown throughout history to the wonders of nature, and to their great love of its beauty.

Those words temporarily wrap up this write-up because I love so much my close affinity with the wonders of nature. There will be more sustainable continuity of write-ups in the very near future of my well-rounded journey of success about Japan in its entirety.

“A worthwhile cool eustress of Japan in its entirety.”  —–Byron M. Vidal

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