My True Sucess, My True Happiness, My True Wealth, and My True Love Journey-Adventure Called Life Best Live

My True Success, My True Happiness, My True Wealth, and My True Love Journey-Adventure Called Life Best Live

By Byron M. Vidal

I’m now listening to strictly only Bob Marley songs through youtube.com while working on this post/blog because I think they are the only songs that suit as of the time being this worthy lifetime endeavor of mine, only my opinion for the time being, wholesome music for all ages.

My very close friend Allen of Holland/Netherlands and I mentored, outreached, and distributed tens of thousands or more of toys, bags, school supplies, shoes, clothes, and life-saving materials all combined to these hundreds of financially poor true scholar children in Payatas garbage Dumpsite/Landfill site, Quezon city, Philippines and orphanages in one province with the major help and sponsor of the mainland Chinese close friend based in Holland of my very close friend Allen.

A significant percentage of the tens of thousands of items/life-saving materials we gave to these financially poor true scholar children that are sons and daughters of Payatas garbage Dumpsite/Landfill site collectors or scavengers and orphans in orphanages in one province came from many families, friends, and hotel employees in Holland and a few countries from Europe.

It’s really hard work for us sorting and distributing intelligently and charitably the tens of thousands or more of toys, bags, school supplies, shoes, clothes, and life-saving materials all combined because the preparation and overall process is months and so many nights of sleep deprivation. It’s truly all worth the time, full attention, tangible and intangible resources, and everything good. More than words can express.

To be continued…

When a person doesn’t have gratitude, something is missing in his or her humanity. A person can almost be defined by his or her attitude toward gratitude.  —–Elie Wiesel (1928- ), Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner

 

I would turn it around and substitute compassion. Gratitude is easy. Compassion requires imagination and so is more difficult.  —–Reply to me on June 29, 2016 of Mr. Robert La Quey, PhD, pioneers of Internet

 

That’s what I consider true generosity. You give your all, and yet you always feel as if it costs you nothing.  —–SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR (1908-1986)

 This is how I define and live my True Success from Ralph Waldo Emerson:

 

Image result for ralph waldo emerson quotes success to laugh often

Image result for ralph waldo emerson quotes success to laugh often

To Endure the Betrayal of False Friends

 

To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics.

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Justin Bieber’s Overboard

After a month or so of not posting or publishing here and also after a month or so of not checking/opening my emails, it’s only now for the first time that I listen to Justin Bieber’s Overboard song and it’s also now for the first time that I read for a few times its lyrics. There are more than 1,001 reasons under the sun why I’m now listening to this song and why I read its lyrics. It’s cool, cool eustress, sweet, romantic, and for true love :-). I’m not a Justin Bieber fun but it really makes sense to listen to this song over and over again.

Embed from Getty Images

2017 Aces Charity Celebrity Basketball Game

It’s somehow luck, chance, funny, and cool because I only find now at first glance and first search this picture/photo of Justin Bieber in those terms, at the same time the first game of my basketball team High Hoops took place only many hours ago. I’m the basketball team consultant and co-team-manager of the basketball team High Hoops. That’s why I decided to choose these pictures/photos of Justin Bieber. It’s also because for a good cause/charity event wherein Justin Bieber is involved. I love so much good cause/charity events.

I’m listening for so many times, over and over again, to Justin Bieber’s Overboard song while typing/doing/making this post/blog :-), pretty way cool, cool eustress.

Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images
Embed from Getty Images

 

 

Unedited Photos I Took For You: My Uncle Isagani’s Cats, Dog, and Butterflies and Dragonfly In His Countryside Garden

Unedited Photos I Took For You: My Uncle’s Cats, Dog, and Butterflies and Dragonfly In His Countryside Garden

I’m Listening to The Beatles Penny Lane song for so many times while doing this cool eustress work and it’s really rockin’ me, making me upbeat, productive, and is making me alive and kicking 🙂

I highly suggest that you listen to The Beatles Penny Lane song for so many times. You can do it through youtube.com because I’m using youtube.com as one of my very effective productivity tool.

They are all often with me when I’m thinking, reading, and writing in this countryside:

 

 

close up red dragonfly

house writing

big grasshopper

grasshopper book

grasshopper dictionary

grasshopper

two dragonfly

grasshopper tony

butterfly small

dog

dog 2

cat

cat 7

cat 6

cat 5

cat 4

cat 3

butterfly 3

butterfly spider

cat 2

butterfly 2

butterfly

reading writing

writing

 

 

24 Days Of Not Using The Internet

24 Days Of Not Using The Internet

by Byron Vidal

Here are the VERY IMPORTANT WORDS WHY I haven’t used the internet for 24 days:

I love to use now the written words of my most favorite contemporary book author nowadays for this post/article, his name is Ryan Holiday, BECAUSE we nearly have the same EVERYTHING when it comes to BOOKS and READING.

I’m fully listening to Bob Marley’s music while doing this VERY IMPORTANT REMINDER TO MYSELF, YOU included.

Here it goes:

If You’re Trying To Speed Up Your Reading, And Squeeze It Into Every Cranny Of Your Life, You’re Doing It Wrong

If You’re Trying To Speed Up Your Reading, And Squeeze It Into Every Cranny Of Your Life, You’re Doing It Wrong

By Ryan Holiday

I love books. I love reading. I do it as much as I can. I tell people they should do the same and have for a long time. But when I hear that people are now actively working up their tolerance to listen to audiobooks on higher and higher speeds, try ‘hack’ reading through courses or apps, when they listen to snippets of books while they walk to the fridge, I just shake my head.

Guys, you’re doing it wrong! You’re missing the point!

Reading is like eating, sex and meditation. The whole point is that it’s pleasurable and meaningful. It’s like listening to music. You’re not supposed to rush through it.

But this is apparently the next big trend for entrepreneurs. As Quartzdetailed earlier this week,

“I probably started reading ultra hardcore about seven or eight years ago,” says Tom Bilyeu, an entrepreneur based in Los Angeles. “Ultra hardcore” means that Bilyeu reads everywhere: While he brushes his teeth, while he gets dressed, in the 30 seconds it takes to cross rooms in his house, he’s reading.

“My big secret is,” says Bilyeu, “I read in all those little transitional moments.” Plus, for the last eight years, he’s optimized his intellectual consumption by listening to audiobooks at three times the normal speed.

I know Tom. We’ve even worked together before. He’s a great guy and a lover of books. But he’s doing it wrong and if you follow his example, you will be too.

The article goes out to talk about how with the advent of audiobooks, not only can people listen to books faster, they can ‘read’ while they do other things. Multitasking while reading is nonsense. It reminds me of that episode of Seinfeld where George tries to incorporate food and watching sports into making love. Reading is good enough on its own man, and it’s not only justifiable on its own—it’s one of the best things you can be doing with your time.

There are only two other tasks that when added to reading improve it: 1. Sitting in a beautiful place. 2. Listening to a great soundtrack. Everything else isn’t additive—its subtractive.

The sad truth about the search for productivity hacks is that the logic is almost always penny wise and pound foolish. People spend an hour developing an email template that will save them 20 seconds when they respond to something…but then they willingly fly across the country for a three day conference where nothing gets accomplished. They scout out the best writing software and then procrastinate the act of actually sitting down to use it. They hire a virtual assistant to manage their schedule but they never question whether the meetings and phone calls even need to happen.

Take Tom’s strategy for example. People who use it make it sound like they are somehow getting a ton of reading done. Like way more than the rest of us Stone Age, analog humans. All the time you spend brushing your teeth and in other transitional moments add up—especially if you’re consuming at triple speed—seems like a compelling argument. Yet in the article it says he reads just 50 books a year. That’s only one a week!

If it was like 500, I think we might have to look at it and go, “Maybe they’re onto something.” I managed more than a book a week when I had two full-time jobs and was writing a book of my own. That’s not a brag, it’s just a fact. There was plenty of time because it was important to me. I made it part of my job. There are single mothers struggling to make ends meet that go through four library books a month, I’m sure of it. No hacks required!

There are so many things that can be cut out or de-prioritized before you ever need to start reading in the shower. There are so many things to optimize first (what books you’re reading, what you retain from those books, what you do with those books) that will have a bigger impact. But I’ll put it simply: You don’t need to squeeze reading into the in-between moments of your life, you need to squeeze the other crap out and make reading and reading well the priority.

Yesterday, I flew from Chicago to Austin. I had a first class upgrade and was surrounded by business people—all of them the exact type of person who would say things like “I’m too busy to read.” And what were they doing on this flight? Watching movies on their iPads, answering emails, chattering about bullshit. I was the only one who had a physical book open and actually reading. In two and a half hours of concentration, I got almost all the way through the book I had brought.

But getting close to finishing a book is not what I am proud of. I’m proud that I had a couple hours of quiet, reflective time. The book I am reading is about a man’s attempt to retract Coronado’s expedition through the Southwest on horseback. I was transported from that plane to the desert. To 500 years ago. I was away from the distractions of the world. I was moved by the writing. I was fully engaged. I was learning. I was still.

We have to remember, we don’t get a prize at the end of life for having churned through as many books as possible. Remember: quality over quantity. Always. It doesn’t matter how much you end up reading—your collection will never be bigger than a County Branch Library. But the selection can be better—it could be a lot better. The time you spend reading them, the time you carved out and gave to the process—that’s what you’ll remember at the end of your life. That is the prize.

So as someone who loves to read, who reads a lot and think people should read more, as someone who gets nice big checks at the end of the year from the sales of my own audiobooks, I’m begging you, please don’t deprive yourself of one of life’s most important experiences. Don’t pursue efficiency at the sake of efficacy. I get that these folks mean well—but they’re going about it wrong.

There is just one rule that great readers share: They value reading. They make it a priority. They don’t squeeze it in between their other priorities. They make it the priority. They know that from this, everything else follows—the more you read and the more time you make for it, the better you are at it. The more time you end up having for it (it creates success which creates leisure). They love it so much they aren’t trying to shove themselves full of it

until they’re sick. No, they savor it.

And so should you.

How To Read More — A Lot More

By Ryan Holiday

When you read a lot of books people inevitably assume you speed read. In fact, that’s probably the most common email I get. They want to know my trick for reading so fast. They see all the books I recommend every month in my reading newsletter and assume I must have some secret. So they ask me to teach them how to speed read.

That’s when I tell them I don’t have a secret. Even though I read hundreds of books every single year, I actually read quite slow. In fact, I read deliberately slow, so that I can take notes (and then whenever I finish a book, I go back through and transcribe these notes for my version of a commonplace book.

So where do I get the time? (Well for starters I don’t waste any of it asking dumb questions).

Look, where do you get the time to eat three meals a day? How do you have time to do all that sleeping? How do you manage to spend all those hours with your kids or wife or a girlfriend or boyfriend?

You don’t get that time anywhere, do you? You just make it because it’s really important. It’s a non-negotiable part of your life.

I think there are three main barriers that hold people back from making this happen and I want to disassemble them right now so you can start reading way, way more.

Time

The key to reading lots of book begins with stop thinking of it as some activity that you do. Reading must become as natural as eating and breathing to you. It’s not something you do because you feel like it, but because it’s a reflex, a default.

Carry a book with you at all times. Every time you get a second, crack it open. Don’t install games on your phone–that’s time you could be reading. When you’re eating, read. When you’re on the train, in the waiting room, at the office–read. It’s work, really important work. Don’t let anyone ever let you feel like it’s not.

Do you know how much time you waste during the day? Conference calls, meetings, TV shows that you don’t really like but watch anyway. Well, if you can make time for that you can make time for reading. (Or better, just swap those activities for books)

Money

If I had to steal books to support my reading habit, I would. Thankfully you can buy some of the best literature ever published for pennies on Amazon.

But forget money entirely when it comes to books. Reading is not a luxury. It’s not something you splurge on. It’s a necessity.

As Erasmus, the 16th century scholar once put it, “When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.”

On top of that, books are an investment. I hear from people all the time who tell me they plan to buy this book or that book. Plan? Just buy it. I promised myself a long time ago that if I saw a book that interested me I’d never let time or money or anything else prevent me from having it. Not money, not time, not my own laziness. Don’t wait around for some book you want to read to come out in paperback–trying to save $2 or $3 is the wrong mindset. If it’s a book you’ll read, then read it now, not in a year.

(One related note: I don’t check books out from the library and haven’t since I was a child. This isn’t like renting a mindless movie. You should be keeping the books you read for reference and for re-reading. If you are OK giving the books back after two weeks you might want to examine what you are reading).

Purpose

Perhaps the reason you having trouble is you forgot the purpose of reading. It’s not just for fun. Human beings have been recording their knowledge in book form for more than 5,000 years. That means that whatever you’re working on right now, whatever problem you’re struggling with, is probably addressed in some book somewhere by someone a lot smarter than you. Save yourself the trouble of learning from trial and error–find that point. Benefit from that perspective.

The walls of my house are covered in books from floor to ceiling. The last time I moved, I had to rent a U-Haul exclusively for books. At first that frustrated me, and then I remembered that books paid the rent on both those houses. They kept me sane, they made me a lot of money.

The purpose of reading is not just raw knowledge. It’s that it is part of the human experience. It helps you find meaning, understand yourself, and make your life better.

There is very little else that you can say that about. Very little else like that under $20 too.

Look, you either get this or you don’t. Reading is something you know is important and want to do more of. Or you’re someone who just doesn’t read. If you’re the latter, you’re on your own (you’re also probably not that smart).

Think of someone like Frederick Douglass, who brought himself up out of slavery by sneaking out and teaching himself to read. Books weren’t some idle pursuit or pastime to him, they were survival itself. And despite this dire situation, he managed to read  and, as the writer Thomas Sowell once put it, “educate himself to the point where his words now have to be explained to today’s expensively under-educated generation.”

What excuse do you have?

If you want to read more, there’s no real secret. It’s about adjusting your priorities and your perception so that reading becomes an extension of who you are and what you do.

When that happens, you’ll be the person that people now ask: How do you do it? And the answer will be: I just do.

Thank you to your written words my most favorite contemporary book author nowadays, Ryan Holiday. Thank you. Thank you