Think Big: I Love these Words from the Book

Think Big: I Love these Words from the Book

From the book Think Big of Ben Carson, MD:

In writing Think Big, I want to discuss the concept of success—which the word for, unfortunately, has often been mistakenly used.

For some, success means making it to the top of the ladder, regardless of what one has to do to get there.

These same people measure success by what they accumulate and how many millions of dollars they are worth.

Frankly, it saddens me when I speak at schools and during the question-and-answer period students ask:

“What kind of house do you live in?”

“How many cars do you have?” “Do you have a swimming pool?”

As far as I am concerned, the money and what it buys are insignificant. Achievers are going to have those things anyway.

What is important—what I consider success—is that we make a contribution to our world.

I think of success as reaching beyond ourselves and helping other people in specific ways.

Ben Carson, MD, is professor neurosurgery, plastic surgery, oncology, and pediatrics, and the director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.


Post for Your Day

The children are sons and daughters of garbage workers in Payatas garbage site, Quezon city, Philippines.

The children are residing very near to the huge garbage site that’s not very conducive to an abode.

The children are scholars and supported by a Foundation that’s why they look clean and fresh. Honestly, all the children are very courteous when we did an outreach to them.

Everything you know can be taught to someone else. You’ve worked in an office, an experience which you and most of the people you know take for granted. But to some people, that experience is valuable. You could teach them workplace skills, appropriate dress, proper office and phone etiquette, or how to work a computer. Don’t discount anything you do as mundane or old hat—–to someone else, it’s gold.

—–Greg Nelson, volunteer, Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA) and Oregon Native American Business and Entrepreneurial Network (ONABEN)

Solar Energy, The Clean Tech Revolution, and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond

Solar Energy, The Clean Tech Revolution, and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond

Small-scale experiments for best practices and beyond leads to national and global growth and development that’s renewable and sustainable; best and less carbon footprint and consumption of natural resources.

Me and my effective team is always thinking and doing small-scale experiments for best practices and beyond that’s sustainable and renewable.

On October 22, 1978, China’s leader Deng Xiaoping and 83 year old Founder Konosuke Matsushita of Japan’s Matsushita Electronic met in person in Japan for Meeting of the Minds and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond that’s sustainable and renewable. Both real men practiced real deal leadership.

Mr. Konosuke Matsushita of Japan asked China’s leader Deng Xiaoping what he might find of interest in Japan.

Mr. Deng Xiaoping answered that winters were extremely cold in China and people had to burn briquettes to stay warm, with the result that they often fell prey to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Mr. Deng Xiaoping wondered whether Japan had briquettes which did not produce carbon monoxide.

Mr. Deny was the first Chinese official to visit Japan since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949. It was symbolic that he made this one of his first foreign visits after assuming his new responsibilities.

It was of course not lost on Deng that Japan was having a very successful experience in rebuilding a war-ravaged country.

A closer relationship with a booming neighbor would help China in its own rebuilding through shared experience, trade, and economic development.

The last thirty years of an increasingly better relationship with Japan has vindicated Deng’s early judgment and first steps not only to open China up but to bury an old hatred, and build new relationships to enable China to join the world.

That’s what I call real leadership.

Why I cite them from the books Wu Xiaobo’s China Emerging and China’s Megatrends of John & Doris Naisbitt?

Because from the book The Undercover Economist of Tim Harford, China’s leader Deng Xiaoping initiated first small-scale experiments to rice/agricultural reforms that created the momentum to the rest of the economy. Those who had good ideas, good luck, and who worked hard prospered.

And Why I cite Japan?

Because Japanese from the book Japan: The Story of A Nation of Edwin O. Reischauer, foster the notable propensity for cooperation and consensus decision-making in small groups.

To be continued about this blog/article because I’m now somehow tired because of many factors and due diligence.

Understanding Well It Takes Talent, Hard Work, and Smart Work

The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.

—–Vidal Sassoon

I took this picture when I was in an ethnic or tribe community hundreds of kilometers away from the capital city of the Philippines.

When I went and stayed in this ethnic or indigenous community they don’t have traditional electricity supply for many months because the ethnic/indigenous or tribe community was devastated by a Supertyphoon a few days before December 25, Christmas.

Because of many factors their traditional electricity supply wasn’t put back for many months.

I just shared my very very very very very little own tangible and intangible help for some people in this very distant ethnic/indigenous or tribe community.  It was very cool.  Very Cool Eutress:-)






Start and Make Your Day and Night As Your Best Ever

Start and Make Your Day and Night As Your Best Ever

I’m not here to tell you now what to do because you really know what to do now.

You really have what it takes.

There are countless information through internet, reading materials, your firsthand experiences, and people you meet and often meet throughout your lifetime.

I’m just here to push you a bit to just do it and correct course along the way, along your day and night, to make adjustments along the way, along your day and night.

Just Do It, start your first step or one step, then always do it with one step or steps that follow.

You really know it. You really know what to do now.

Don’t tell me you don’t know it. Don’t tell me you can’t do it.

Just do it first with your one step then another step and the steps that follow.

I’ll leave now these very important words for you to remember always:

“I don’t divide the world into the weak and the strong, or the successes and the failures. I divide the world into the learners and nonlearners.” —–Benjamin Barber—