Solar Energy, The Clean Tech Revolution, and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond

Solar Energy, The Clean Tech Revolution, and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond

Small-scale experiments for best practices and beyond leads to national and global growth and development that’s renewable and sustainable; best and less carbon footprint and consumption of natural resources.

Me and my effective team is always thinking and doing small-scale experiments for best practices and beyond that’s sustainable and renewable.

On October 22, 1978, China’s leader Deng Xiaoping and 83 year old Founder Konosuke Matsushita of Japan’s Matsushita Electronic met in person in Japan for Meeting of the Minds and Adopting Best Practices and Beyond that’s sustainable and renewable. Both real men practiced real deal leadership.

Mr. Konosuke Matsushita of Japan asked China’s leader Deng Xiaoping what he might find of interest in Japan.

Mr. Deng Xiaoping answered that winters were extremely cold in China and people had to burn briquettes to stay warm, with the result that they often fell prey to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Mr. Deng Xiaoping wondered whether Japan had briquettes which did not produce carbon monoxide.

Mr. Deny was the first Chinese official to visit Japan since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949. It was symbolic that he made this one of his first foreign visits after assuming his new responsibilities.

It was of course not lost on Deng that Japan was having a very successful experience in rebuilding a war-ravaged country.

A closer relationship with a booming neighbor would help China in its own rebuilding through shared experience, trade, and economic development.

The last thirty years of an increasingly better relationship with Japan has vindicated Deng’s early judgment and first steps not only to open China up but to bury an old hatred, and build new relationships to enable China to join the world.

That’s what I call real leadership.

Why I cite them from the books Wu Xiaobo’s China Emerging and China’s Megatrends of John & Doris Naisbitt?

Because from the book The Undercover Economist of Tim Harford, China’s leader Deng Xiaoping initiated first small-scale experiments to rice/agricultural reforms that created the momentum to the rest of the economy. Those who had good ideas, good luck, and who worked hard prospered.

And Why I cite Japan?

Because Japanese from the book Japan: The Story of A Nation of Edwin O. Reischauer, foster the notable propensity for cooperation and consensus decision-making in small groups.

To be continued about this blog/article because I’m now somehow tired because of many factors and due diligence.

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Japan: The Story Of A Nation

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Japan: The Story Of A Nation

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How do I start writing about this worthwhile pursuit?  Let me first pause and think well. Word by word, my well-rounded journey of success about Japan in its entirety.  First and foremost, it all nearly started with the book, Japan: The Story Of A Nation, authored by Edwin O. Reischauer.  One thing leads to another, or even more.  The long standing adage somehow keeps me on track,  “A Journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”  Word by word every step of my way.

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The book,  Japan: The Story Of A Nation by Edwin O. Reischauer was written or originally published so many years before I was born.  It was originally published on 1970.  The book has four editions, the one that I own is the third edition.  The very first thought that comes to my mind when the book is at stake is the very own words from the book itself:

The notable Japanese propensity for cooperation and consensus decision-making in small groups.

Why those words impact me well as part of my life-changing experience? Because for me it’s real deal leadership at its very best.

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The second thought that comes to my mind is the very own words from the book itself:

The great sensitivity the Japanese have shown throughout history to the wonders of nature, and to their great love of its beauty.

Those words temporarily wrap up this write-up because I love so much my close affinity with the wonders of nature. There will be more sustainable continuity of write-ups in the very near future of my well-rounded journey of success about Japan in its entirety.

“A worthwhile cool eustress of Japan in its entirety.”  —–Byron M. Vidal

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