Success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.

Success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.

First and foremost, before and while writing now this idea-reality there are countless distractions, distractions I’m aware and unaware of, so many of them are hard-wired to my brain.

The countless distractions/minutae are really getting in the way of my priceless full attention to very important ideas and actions. But I must concentrate relentlessly to very important ideas and actions.

I’m writing now through my very basic pen and paper, a black Pilot Fine ballpen and my notebook with the front cover “Start Your Day with A Big Challenge to Achieve Big Success.”

I remember now while writing, the departed Og Mandino’s words from one of the MP3 audios I listened to so many years ago. It goes like this, “success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.”

I write those words of the departed Og Mandino because there’s one YouTube video I often see whenever I visit the YouTube app and the video is often recommended to me by YouTube app but I’m just really taking it for granted because I don’t know or I’m unfamiliar of the person of the video.

That’s why the departed Og Mandino is right, “success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.”

So as of today’s morning prior to the start of this writing, I give the shot of full attention to watch the video from start to finish twice.

I’m posting this YouTube video now because it’s truly a high level life-changing full attention to give in. It’s really worth it.

I’m posting this YouTube video because of priceless-nonprofit educational purposes for the benefit of relentless unconventional learners and researchers.

My parting words for this post is one of my favorites from African Proverb, “it takes a village to raise a child.”

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Sleeping, Thinking, and Speaking Well to Success

Sleeping, Thinking, and Speaking Well to Success

by Byron M. Vidal

1. SLEEPING WELL

Sleeping well is an essential element to success. Sleeping well leads you to thinking well. Many students and laborers tend to give up sleep in order to achieve more. But studies show that it is better for the brain to sleep for a shorter number of uninterrupted hours than a longer number of fitful ones. We depend on our cognitive skills in our professional lives and when we fail to get a good sleep, our abilities to focus and concentrate, reason, remember and make good judgement is impaired.
Nothing is more essential to the brain’s physiological health and everyday maintenance than healthy sleep. Researchers at the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York found that that our brain performs a nightly flush where the brain rids itself of all metabolic by-products and waste that the brain cells produce as they work. This waste that gets tossed into a fluid area between tissue cells that make-up 20% of the brain is what is flushed out during this cerebral downtime that happens while we sleep.
Compared to good sleepers, poor sleepers tend to struggle to concentrate, are more likely to experience low mood and are more likely to be irritable. This could result to strained relationships, reduced productivity and a range of mental and physical health problems.
So the next time you are tempted to work late and burn the midnight oil, remember that sacrificing sleep could actually put you to a disadvantage. Putting in regular hours of sleep with a clear mind leaves you more focused and productive the next day, and you’ll feel healthier for it.
“Sleep is the one-third of our lives that affects the other two-thirds. Sleep well, live well.”    -Dr. Safwan BADR, former president of the American Academy of sleep medicine.

2. THINKING WELL

The world’s most successful people have one thing in common: they think differently from everyone else. This is how John C. Maxwell introduces his New York Times bestseller, How Successful People Think.

  1. Thinking is a discipline. If you want to be better at it, you’ve got to work at it. Thinking well is the hardest work.  Melt and trim the unnecessary fat and plant and reap from your thinking well.
  2. Spend time with people who challenge you. Smart thinkers expose themselves to different ideas and type of people.
  3. It’s one thing to have an idea, another to follow through. “Ideas have a short shelf-life and you must act on them before the expiration date.”
  4. Thoughts need time to develop. Don’t just settle on the first thing that comes to mind. Thoughts need to be shaped until they have substance and they need to stand the test of “clarity and questioning”
  5. Smart people collaborate with other smart people. Thinking with others has its benefits. It’s like allowing yourself a shortcut to experiencing everything and learning from them.
  6. Reject popular thinking (or not thinking at all)
  7. To appreciate others’ ideas, you need to value other ideas. Don’t think that you are always right. Be open to other ideas so you can have room to expand your own.
  8. Engage in reflective thinking to allow yourself perspective and confidence in your decision-making. As Socrates said, “An unexamined life is not worth living.”
  9. Get over negative self-talk. Winners think in terms of “I will” and “I can” Smart people see possibilities, and not limitations. Former baseball star Sam Ewing once said nothing is so embarrassing as watching someone do something that you said could not be done.”
  10. At the end of the day, it’s important to remember we can all change the way we think.

Learning how to master the process of thinking well leads you to productive thinking. If you can develop the discipline of good thinking and turn it into a lifetime habit, then you will be successful and productive all your life.

3.  SPEAKING WELL

Thinking is useless when we don’t use the best words and best tools for it. Think well and speak best with accuracy. Brevity is the soul of wit, as less is often more. The best we select our words, the more we improve, leverage, and maximize our thinking device. Like software, it’s GIGO: Garbage In, Garbage Out. Ludwig Wittgenstein said, “The limits of my language are the limits of my world.” Selecting the best words in every moment of your life with creative, innovative, and expressive best words that you can define with accuracy not with vagueness is a must.  Select and define best words with accuracy daily or many times of the week, even if it is just an exercise.

When talking you must remember these things:

  1. Organize your thoughts. Think before you say anything
  2. Say what you mean
  3. Get to the point and say exactly what you want done
  4. Be concise and use the shortest, most familiar words
  5. Be real. Communicate clearly through your own personality and let the real you come through. People will be more convinced if you are more comfortable with yourself and what you represent.
  6. Speak in images. Use words that will help people visualize concepts.

Listening well is the other side of speaking well. In order to deliver the words that your audience want to hear, you must be able to feel their pulse and put yourself in their shoes.

  1. Show genuine interest and attention. Concentrate so you increase your retention and comprehension.
  2. Use your eyes to communicate. Look for feelings so you can see the real intentions not communicated verbally.
  3. Observe nonverbal signals so you can ask the right questions.
  4. Make the other person talk with ease and not fear being judged.

 

Not sleeping well for success, not thinking well, and not selecting the best words for every moment of your life is dangerous, as they encourage us to fool ourselves and others. I say, “Sleeping well for success, thinking well, and the habit of selective and usage of best words is the recipe of true success.”

5 Things Every Aspiring Reader and Writer Must Know

5 Things Every Aspiring Reader and Writer Must Know

by Byron M. Vidal

There is a reader and writer in all of us. However, most of us are hesitant to read one book, one novel and much more write one blog, one story or two because we do not feel confident that we would be able to give justice to the work that we do. We can’t even begin that first sentence because we often believe that this craft is only for those who are born with the skill to do it. I have listed down some thoughts that I believe an aspiring reader and writer must have in order to begin their journey towards pursuing these crafts. Here it goes.

  1. Believe that ONE OF THE GREATEST READERS AND WRITERS OF ALL TIME is you.
  2. There’s no magic or mystery to reading and writing as a worthy pursuit of a lifetime. Some people say it’s just habitual reading and clear writing. Others say that reading and writing requires special talents and little-known techniques. The truth is it lies somewhere in the middle. It takes certain skills and knowledge to do it. But with just a few key strategies and tools, even the beginner can read and write beneficially.
  3. It’s nearly impossible to get through the day without reading and writing in any kind of language or dialect, at least to some extent. It’s a small and big part of your life, whether you like it or not.
  4. There are so many times that one action and one book can make all the difference in your life. That one action is reading and writing, small steps win big.
  5. Read and write from yourself. Learn from yourself.

I’d love to share the story of J.J. Holcom from the book entitled “The Writer Within” by Larry Bloom. His little essay of life in the aisles of a grocery store, the first piece he ever wrote, which earned him $250. At that time J.J. Holcom didn’t know he was writing an essay when he responded to an article written about grocery shopping. He was writing a letter to the editor on notebook paper. It gave such an astonishing look inside a big store and so brimming with good humor that he decided it should not be published as a letter. It deserved a page of its own.

And so J.J. Holcom received the call, and heard the question writers are dying to hear: “What’s your Social Security number?” It was then we learned that J.J, a genuine Hartford Wit*, had never made it past the eleventh grade. Moreover, when he was in school, he had serious problems with writing; it was one of his weakest subjects. He always wrote awkwardly and ineffectively in the manner that teachers had insisted on. It was only years later, when he took pencil in hand and scribbled himself-consciously, thinking he was only writing a letter to the editor, that the real passionate, persuasive expression – the natural voice – of J.J. Holcom emerged.”

Go get that paper and pen and write down your thoughts. Start that journey armed with all these positive thoughts and be the reader and writer you wish to be. Just do it.

*Connecticut Wit, any of a group of Federalist poets from Hartford, Connecticut., who collaborated to produce a considerable body of political satire just after the American Revolution. (definition: Encyclopedia Britannica)

Audrey Hepburn: “Nothing Is Impossible, The Word Itself Says, “I’m Possible.”

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Audrey Hepburn: “Nothing Is Impossible, The Word Itself Says, “I’m Possible.”

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Supposedly, I will not post a blog within the many hours of internet use because of an extent of preparation but after listening to so many music through youtube.com I decided suddenly to change the music’s pacing and category.

I switched to the music of Theme from a Summer Place of 1952, then I came across Audrey Hepburn’s Moon River @ youtube.com. I tried to watch and listen to it for the first time, the theme of these blog post showed up, the big bold words.

The departed American business philosopher Jim Rohn is way cool, “You will never know when and what is life changing.”

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Cool Eustress words and photos from Audrey Hepburn 🙂

“I believe in pink, that laughing is the best calorie-burner, in staying strong when everything seems to be going wrong, that happy girls are the prettiest girls, that tomorrow is another day. Most importantly, I believe in miracles.” ——–Audrey Hepburn