Success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.

Success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.

First and foremost, before and while writing now this idea-reality there are countless distractions, distractions I’m aware and unaware of, so many of them are hard-wired to my brain.

The countless distractions/minutae are really getting in the way of my priceless full attention to very important ideas and actions. But I must concentrate relentlessly to very important ideas and actions.

I’m writing now through my very basic pen and paper, a black Pilot Fine ballpen and my notebook with the front cover “Start Your Day with A Big Challenge to Achieve Big Success.”

I remember now while writing, the departed Og Mandino’s words from one of the MP3 audios I listened to so many years ago. It goes like this, “success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.”

I write those words of the departed Og Mandino because there’s one YouTube video I often see whenever I visit the YouTube app and the video is often recommended to me by YouTube app but I’m just really taking it for granted because I don’t know or I’m unfamiliar of the person of the video.

That’s why the departed Og Mandino is right, “success is just right under our nose or just right in front of your nose.”

So as of today’s morning prior to the start of this writing, I give the shot of full attention to watch the video from start to finish twice.

I’m posting this YouTube video now because it’s truly a high level life-changing full attention to give in. It’s really worth it.

I’m posting this YouTube video because of priceless-nonprofit educational purposes for the benefit of relentless unconventional learners and researchers.

My parting words for this post is one of my favorites from African Proverb, “it takes a village to raise a child.”

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Think Big: I Love these Words from the Book

Think Big: I Love these Words from the Book

From the book Think Big of Ben Carson, MD:

In writing Think Big, I want to discuss the concept of success—which the word for, unfortunately, has often been mistakenly used.

For some, success means making it to the top of the ladder, regardless of what one has to do to get there.

These same people measure success by what they accumulate and how many millions of dollars they are worth.

Frankly, it saddens me when I speak at schools and during the question-and-answer period students ask:

“What kind of house do you live in?”

“How many cars do you have?” “Do you have a swimming pool?”

As far as I am concerned, the money and what it buys are insignificant. Achievers are going to have those things anyway.

What is important—what I consider success—is that we make a contribution to our world.

I think of success as reaching beyond ourselves and helping other people in specific ways.

Ben Carson, MD, is professor neurosurgery, plastic surgery, oncology, and pediatrics, and the director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

Understanding Well It Takes Talent, Hard Work, and Smart Work

The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.

—–Vidal Sassoon

I took this picture when I was in an ethnic or tribe community hundreds of kilometers away from the capital city of the Philippines.

When I went and stayed in this ethnic or indigenous community they don’t have traditional electricity supply for many months because the ethnic/indigenous or tribe community was devastated by a Supertyphoon a few days before December 25, Christmas.

Because of many factors their traditional electricity supply wasn’t put back for many months.

I just shared my very very very very very little own tangible and intangible help for some people in this very distant ethnic/indigenous or tribe community.  It was very cool.  Very Cool Eutress:-)

 

 

 

 

 

My True Sucess, My True Happiness, My True Wealth, and My True Love Journey-Adventure Called Life Best Live

My True Success, My True Happiness, My True Wealth, and My True Love Journey-Adventure Called Life Best Live

By Byron M. Vidal

I’m now listening to strictly only Bob Marley songs through youtube.com while working on this post/blog because I think they are the only songs that suit as of the time being this worthy lifetime endeavor of mine, only my opinion for the time being, wholesome music for all ages.

My very close friend Allen of Holland/Netherlands and I mentored, outreached, and distributed tens of thousands or more of toys, bags, school supplies, shoes, clothes, and life-saving materials all combined to these hundreds of financially poor true scholar children in Payatas garbage Dumpsite/Landfill site, Quezon city, Philippines and orphanages in one province with the major help and sponsor of the mainland Chinese close friend based in Holland of my very close friend Allen.

A significant percentage of the tens of thousands of items/life-saving materials we gave to these financially poor true scholar children that are sons and daughters of Payatas garbage Dumpsite/Landfill site collectors or scavengers and orphans in orphanages in one province came from many families, friends, and hotel employees in Holland and a few countries from Europe.

It’s really hard work for us sorting and distributing intelligently and charitably the tens of thousands or more of toys, bags, school supplies, shoes, clothes, and life-saving materials all combined because the preparation and overall process is months and so many nights of sleep deprivation. It’s truly all worth the time, full attention, tangible and intangible resources, and everything good. More than words can express.

To be continued…

When a person doesn’t have gratitude, something is missing in his or her humanity. A person can almost be defined by his or her attitude toward gratitude.  —–Elie Wiesel (1928- ), Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner

 

I would turn it around and substitute compassion. Gratitude is easy. Compassion requires imagination and so is more difficult.  —–Reply to me on June 29, 2016 of Mr. Robert La Quey, PhD, pioneers of Internet

 

That’s what I consider true generosity. You give your all, and yet you always feel as if it costs you nothing.  —–SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR (1908-1986)

 This is how I define and live my True Success from Ralph Waldo Emerson:

 

Image result for ralph waldo emerson quotes success to laugh often

Image result for ralph waldo emerson quotes success to laugh often

To Endure the Betrayal of False Friends

 

To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics.

I’m Reminded That It’s Been A Month Since I Published :-)

I’m Reminded That It’s Been A Month Since I Published Here 🙂

carabao 24

carabao 23

A few days ago I had a lively and sensible conversation with a veteran journalist who’s in his 7O’s.  I told him that I am using the internet with the art of the sit-down only after many weeks or more than a month, or so because I often practice or make it a habit the art of nearly off the grid each and every day and I love the essentials of life each and every day. His response to me was “Wow.”

I don’t listen to music each and every day but when I do I make sure that I listen to music for many hours relentlessly.  Right now, I’m listening to Bob Marley’s live performance music while thinking, reading, and writing and while the intense rain is happening.

Prior to listening to Bob Marley’s live performance for many hours tonight, I was listening for many hours repetitively to Marvin Gaye’s Got to Give It Up and Let’s Get It On; Michael Jackson’s You Rock My World, Rock With You, The Way You Make Me Feel, Remember The Time, Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough; Janet Jackson’s Together Again and All For You; and The Beatles’ Penny Lane. The Beatles’ Penny Lane is also one of the worthwhile songs.

Real Good Music and Dancing Keeps Me In Cool Eustress Mode. —–Byron M. Vidal

 

Image result for ralph waldo emerson quotes success to laugh often

Image result for ralph waldo emerson quotes success to laugh often

Nowadays, I often teach, dance, and get real wet in the rain with children and it’s a great feeling to hear from children that they really like you because they are saying you are a good influence and role model to them. When they do, they do their part, efforts, and they pursue you. Read the above photos. Kids can really tell, you can’t really lie to them for long. To leave the world a bit better. To know one life has breathed easier because You have lived—–this is to have succeeded.

Takeaways from Jason Dorsey’s Redefining Rich-Maverick Minute that’s Part of My Very Important Perspective in Life Before I Read it Today: My Shared Consciousness for a Long Period of Time

Takeaways from Jason Dorsey’s Redefining Rich-Maverick Minute that’s Part of My Very Important Perspective in Life Before I Read it Today: My Shared Consciousness for a Long Period of Time

by Byron M. Vidal

Jason Dorsey’s friend had taken his company public. He was worth a fortune (think: winning the lottery every week for a year).

From Jason Dorsey’s friend, “I don’t judge my success based on our stock price or how much money in the bank—-or even what I leave to my kids. I judge my success based on how many of my employees leave our company to start their own business.”

From Jason Dorsey himself:

I found this shocking, not only because if I were in his shoes I’d at least get one fancy car, but also because his company is consistently rated a Best Place to Work in the entire state of Texas—-and that’s a big state. Yet here he is saying that success to him was all about empowering his own employees to leave his company and start their own entrepreneurial journey.

The more I thought about my own definition of success—-which over time has changed from a fast car to quality time at the park with my 3-year-old daughter—-the more I realize success is never achieved. It’s a journey of personal growth.

When we help others achieve their goals, like starting a company or a nonprofit, we give our employees the opportunity to re-create the same scenario with their own employees. The cycle continues, and generations benefit from it.

Encouraging employees to leave their jobs to start their own businesses flies in the face of an all-important employee metric: retention. But as my friend shared with me, the more he helps his employees develop the skill set and mindset needed to start their own businesses, the more talented employees he attracts to his own company.

Still from Jason Dorsey:

Success is not buying a sports car, taking your company public for $500 million or retiring early, but rather helping others to pave their own paths so they can impact the world in their own positive ways. Wealth is what we give to others to pass on through their own actions, lives and journeys.

And that is why I keep that old Corvette poster from eighth grade in my garage—-to remind me that how we define success changes as we do. (And maybe, just maybe, my daughter will want that poster someday. That, or she’ll think it’s cool I have a picture of an antique hanging on the wall!)