5 Things Every Aspiring Reader and Writer Must Know

5 Things Every Aspiring Reader and Writer Must Know

by Byron M. Vidal

There is a reader and writer in all of us. However, most of us are hesitant to read one book, one novel and much more write one blog, one story or two because we do not feel confident that we would be able to give justice to the work that we do. We can’t even begin that first sentence because we often believe that this craft is only for those who are born with the skill to do it. I have listed down some thoughts that I believe an aspiring reader and writer must have in order to begin their journey towards pursuing these crafts. Here it goes.

  1. Believe that ONE OF THE GREATEST READERS AND WRITERS OF ALL TIME is you.
  2. There’s no magic or mystery to reading and writing as a worthy pursuit of a lifetime. Some people say it’s just habitual reading and clear writing. Others say that reading and writing requires special talents and little-known techniques. The truth is it lies somewhere in the middle. It takes certain skills and knowledge to do it. But with just a few key strategies and tools, even the beginner can read and write beneficially.
  3. It’s nearly impossible to get through the day without reading and writing in any kind of language or dialect, at least to some extent. It’s a small and big part of your life, whether you like it or not.
  4. There are so many times that one action and one book can make all the difference in your life. That one action is reading and writing, small steps win big.
  5. Read and write from yourself. Learn from yourself.

I’d love to share the story of J.J. Holcom from the book entitled “The Writer Within” by Larry Bloom. His little essay of life in the aisles of a grocery store, the first piece he ever wrote, which earned him $250. At that time J.J. Holcom didn’t know he was writing an essay when he responded to an article written about grocery shopping. He was writing a letter to the editor on notebook paper. It gave such an astonishing look inside a big store and so brimming with good humor that he decided it should not be published as a letter. It deserved a page of its own.

And so J.J. Holcom received the call, and heard the question writers are dying to hear: “What’s your Social Security number?” It was then we learned that J.J, a genuine Hartford Wit*, had never made it past the eleventh grade. Moreover, when he was in school, he had serious problems with writing; it was one of his weakest subjects. He always wrote awkwardly and ineffectively in the manner that teachers had insisted on. It was only years later, when he took pencil in hand and scribbled himself-consciously, thinking he was only writing a letter to the editor, that the real passionate, persuasive expression – the natural voice – of J.J. Holcom emerged.”

Go get that paper and pen and write down your thoughts. Start that journey armed with all these positive thoughts and be the reader and writer you wish to be. Just do it.

*Connecticut Wit, any of a group of Federalist poets from Hartford, Connecticut., who collaborated to produce a considerable body of political satire just after the American Revolution. (definition: Encyclopedia Britannica)
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